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132,320 notes - Posted 1 week ago

0hmylaurie:

You know what book series is not mentioned nearly enough and talks about a very important issue in a brilliantly and cleverly imagined science-fictionistic (is that a word?), futuristic world?

image

(Source: lauriedumas)


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5,955 notes - Posted 2 weeks ago

myurlhasbeencompromised:

the-woman-of-belgravia:

condwiramurs:

shirtlesslion:

STORY IDEA: YOUR DOOR BELL RINGS AND ITS A PERSON FROM AN ALTERNATE UNIVERSE “I JUST WANT YOU TO KNOW THAT YOU ARE MY FAVORITE BOOK CHARACTER AND I KNOW HOW IT ENDS AND I WANNA CHANGE IT”

WHY DID YOU DO THAT TO ME

WOAH WOAH WOAH WOAH WOAH WAIT

HOW DOES MY BOOK END!?!?!?!?!?

WHY DOES IT NEED TO BE CHANGED!?!?!?!?!

"Who’s the author?"
"George R. R. Martin."
"…shit."


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189,481 notes - Posted 2 weeks ago

I wouldn’t mind, but splitting children’s books strictly along gender lines is not even good publishing. Just like other successful children’s books, The Hunger Games was not aimed at girls or boys; like JK Rowling, Roald Dahl, Robert Muchamore and others, Collins just wrote great stories, and readers bought them in their millions. Now, Dahl’s Matilda is published with a pink cover, and I have heard one bookseller report seeing a mother snatching a copy from her small son’s hands saying “That’s for girls” as she replaced it on the shelf.

You see, it is not just girls’ ambitions that are being frustrated by the limiting effects of “books for girls”, in which girls’ roles are all passive, domestic and in front of a mirror. Rebecca Davies, who writes the children’s books blog at Independent.co.uk, tells me that she is equally sick of receiving “books which have been commissioned solely for the purpose of ‘getting boys reading’ [and which have] all-male characters and thin, action-based plots.” What we are doing by pigeon-holing children is badly letting them down. And books, above all things, should be available to any child who is interested in them.

Happily, as the literary editor of The Independent on Sunday, there is something that I can do about this. So I promise now that the newspaper and this website will not be reviewing any book which is explicitly aimed at just girls, or just boys. Nor will The Independent’s books section. And nor will the children’s books blog at Independent.co.uk. Any Girls’ Book of Boring Princesses that crosses my desk will go straight into the recycling pile along with every Great Big Book of Snot for Boys. If you are a publisher with enough faith in your new book that you think it will appeal to all children, we’ll be very happy to hear from you. But the next Harry Potter or Katniss Everdeen will not come in glittery pink covers. So we’d thank you not to send us such books at all.


Gender-specific books demean all our children. So the Independent on Sunday will no longer review anything marketed to exclude either sex - Comment - Voices - The Independent

AMAZE!

(via thebooksmith)

So beautiful.

(via bookarista)

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4,607 notes - Posted 3 weeks ago

I know exactly what I would do with immortality: I would read every book in the library.
Mark Jason Dominus (via bibliophilebunny)
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7,728 notes - Posted 3 weeks ago

I was reading a chapter book about pirates to my pre k class and I had to change the words of the song “what do you do with a drunken pirate..” to “what do you do with a silly pirate”


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1 note - Posted 1 month ago

wildeaboutoscar:



Phillip Island’s Penguin Foundation, a conservation group in Australia, are appealing for volunteers to knit little jumper for these little penguins who have been affected by oil spills or similar leaks from fishing boats. (x)

CAN WE JUST APPRECIATE FOR A SECOND THAT SOMEONE TOOK THE TIME TO NOT ONLY KNIT A PENGUIN A JUMPER BUT ALSO MAKE IT A PENGUIN PUBLISHING BOOK COVER JUMPER (x)

wildeaboutoscar:

Phillip Island’s Penguin Foundation, a conservation group in Australia, are appealing for volunteers to knit little jumper for these little penguins who have been affected by oil spills or similar leaks from fishing boats. (x)

CAN WE JUST APPRECIATE FOR A SECOND THAT SOMEONE TOOK THE TIME TO NOT ONLY KNIT A PENGUIN A JUMPER BUT ALSO MAKE IT A PENGUIN PUBLISHING BOOK COVER JUMPER (x)

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20,126 notes - Posted 1 month ago

adventuresonpaper:

I’ll come back for you i whisper as i caress the books i can’t afford


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159,606 notes - Posted 1 month ago

The problem that needs to be fixed is not kick all the girls out of YA, it’s teach boys that stories featuring female protagonists or written by female authors also apply to them. Boys fall in love. Boys want to be important. Boys have hopes and fears and dreams and ambitions. What boys also have is a sexist society in which they are belittled for “liking girl stuff.” Male is neutral, female is specific.

I heard someone mention that Sarah Rees Brennan’s THE DEMON’S LEXICON would be great for boys, but they’d never read it with that cover. Friends, then the problem is NOT with the book. It’s with the society that’s raising that boy. It’s with the community who inculcated that boy with the idea that he can’t read a book with an attractive guy on the cover.

Here’s how we solve the OMG SO MANY GIRLS IN YA problem: quit treating women like secondary appendages. Quit treating women’s art like it’s a niche, novelty creation only for girls. Quit teaching boys to fear the feminine, quit insisting that it’s a hardship for men to have to relate to anything that doesn’t specifically cater to them.

Because if I can watch Raiders of the Lost Ark and want to grow up to be an archaeologist, there’s no reason at all that a boy shouldn’t be able to read THE DEMON’S LEXICON with its cover on. My friends, sexism doesn’t just hurt women, and our young men’s abysmal rate of attraction to literacy is the proof of it.

If you want to fix the male literary crisis, here’s your solution:

Become a feminist.


The Problem is Not the Books, Saundra Mitchell (via silverstags)

(via lez-brarian)

(Source: becketted)

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52,938 notes - Posted 1 month ago

Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and ‘issues’ fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.

On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter. That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.


"Young Adult Publishing and the John Green Effect" (via bookshop)

Say no to john green

(via divacuppa)

:( I read and loved books by lots of those women authors before I even used the internet and the only reason why I heard about John Green and read his books and still hear about him is because of his YouTube channel with Hank. He arose to popularity through more than just his books. I am not even speaking to the quality of writing or the greatness of the books, I’m just saying that the platforms he used (and maybe his male-ness) got him to where he is. And seeing that this “effect” has occurred makes me sad. Because so many people do such great things that don’t reach enough people. I think its kudos to people who make it work for them though, and you shouldn’t diss him for that, but its sad that others can’t, even if they’re just as (or more?) deserving.

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20,586 notes - Posted 1 month ago

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37,821 notes - Posted 1 month ago

who-is-egay:

A bookstore in Aix en Provence, France

who-is-egay:

A bookstore in Aix en Provence, France

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1,737 notes - Posted 1 month ago

brianabizzare:

My 3rd grade teacher once told me to read the books that are the the most damaged on the outside because you can tell by the damage its been read by a lot of people, and there’s usually a great story on the inside.
This advice hasn’t failed me yet.

(Source: bri-g124)


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251,156 notes - Posted 2 months ago

I used to read books aloud to my cats when I was a kid. We would sit in front of the heater and usually it was Dr. Seuss books.


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2 notes - Posted 2 months ago

There are books which we read early in life, which sink into our consciousness and seem to disappear without leaving a trace. And then one day we find, in some summing-up of our life and our attitudes towards experience, that their influence has been enormous.
"On Truth & Reality" Anaïs Nin (via limb-of-satan)
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36 notes - Posted 2 months ago